University of Hertfordshire

BA (Hons) English Language and Journalism

All journalists use language to convey facts, emotions and stories. Linguists analyse texts to understand the meaning of language. That’s why this course offers a unique opportunity to study both together, enhancing your employability in fields such as in advertising or social media, where both disciplines will be useful. 

Within English language, you’ll learn from lecturers who specialise in a wide variety of linguistic areas of study. This includes for example language and society, psycholinguistics and language and gender. The English language team will share their expert knowledge in the study of sound (phonetics) and language structure (grammar) which are the building blocks that make up human communication. You’ll learn to analyse real life data, transcripts and texts to understand the way we see the world. Many of the modules you can choose are optional so you can specialise in the areas you like most. You could take modules in Teaching English as a Foreign Language or use this chance to explore how language is used to solve crimes in forensic linguistics. Another exciting field is sociolinguistics. You’ll get to explore how people use language differently depending on the context they are in. Is there a difference between male and female language use? Learn about how people make judgements on people’s personalities based solely on their accents and dialects.   

Our journalism team are highly experienced practitioners, who’ll help you develop the skills to produce work in different styles for different platforms such as radio and video and for different websites, magazines and news sites. You’ll produce a showcase of work on a variety of platforms from blogs to print and report on international stories and ones guided by your interests. Want to write on fashion? You can do that. Want to write on sport? No problem. Many students also develop their journalistic interests as they go through the course, often because they have learnt from our former students who come back to give talks about their own professional experience. You’ll learn how to source stories, write in different styles, work as a team member and have the opportunity to take up a work placement in journalism or related areas. 

What's the course about?

In your first year, you’ll explore the diversity of use of the English language including regional variants, language and ethnicity, and slang and street English. In journalism, you’ll be introduced to three key skills—research, writing and interviewing over several different platforms and think about the ethical dilemma journalists face every day.  

In your second year, core modules in English language focus on grammar and the sounds of English. You can explore theories of how and why language developed and study language-related real-life problems such as plagiarism and crime investigation in forensic linguistics. You’ll also have the opportunity to find a news story, create your own magazine, make a radio broadcast and learn about the part journalists played in discovering major scandals or covering the growth of social movements such as Black Lives Matter. 

Work placement/study abroad option: Between your second and final year, you’ll have the option to study abroad or do a work placement for up to a year. Not only will this give you an amazing experience to talk about but will also give your CV a boost. If you’d rather go straight to your final year, that’s fine too. You’ll decide in your second year with us, so there is still plenty of time to think about this.   

In your final year, you can follow modules in different topics, including child language and communication, clinical linguistics, gender and language, and formulaic language, informed by our academics’ own research specialisms. In journalism, you will have the opportunity of doing work experience within journalism or a related field, studying international reporting, creating your own journalistic website, and building a journalism portfolio or creating your own freelance or media business, based on your interests. You will create studio presentations and meet industry practitioners through our series of talks by people working in the communications industry, some of whom are former graduates of UH.  

Entry Requirements

UCAS pointsA LevelBTRCIB
112-120BBC-BBBDMM-DDM112-120

GCSE: Grade 4/C in English Language and 4/D Mathematics

Access course tariff: An overall merit profile in 45 credits at Level 3.

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency, equivalent to an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band

Career Prospects

Employability is central to everything we do. Our hands-on journalism training equips you to pursue a career in the media, whether in features, news, radio or online. You’ll have opportunities to go on work placements at local newspapers, radio stations or TV channels, where many students have work published.

Over the years many of our English Language graduates have gone into teaching or speech and language therapy, as well as translation, publishing, journalism, marketing, law and business. Many go on to higher levels of study, engaging in research in their chosen fields.

For those interested in teaching, all Humanities graduates are guaranteed a post-graduation interview with the School of Education.

Employability is central to everything we do. Our hands-on journalism training equips you to pursue a career in the media, whether in features, news, radio or online. You’ll have opportunities to go on work placements at local newspapers, radio stations or TV channels, where many students have work published.

Over the years many of our English Language graduates have gone into teaching or speech and language therapy, as well as translation, publishing, journalism, marketing, law and business. Many go on to higher levels of study, engaging in research in their chosen fields.

For those interested in teaching, all Humanities graduates are guaranteed an interview with the School of Education.

Course Details

Degree programmes are structured into levels, 4, 5 and 6.  These correspond to your first, second and third/final year of study.  Below you can see what modules you’ll be studying in each. 

Year 1

Introduction to media communications
Introduction to journalism
Journalism, law and ethics
Communication, interaction, context
Global media and society
Investigating language
Introduction to english linguistics 1
Introduction to english linguistics 2

Optional modules
Language and mind
Language in the media

Year 2

English grammar
Sounds of english
Graduate skills
Journalism skills: features
Journalism skills: news

Optional modules
Learning and teaching language 2
Language and species
Language in society
Radio journalism
Social media
Forensic linguistics
Language competencies in career development
History of the english language
Research methods in english language & communication
Learning and teaching language 1

Year 3

Optional modules
Child language & communication
Clinical linguistics
Language & communication project
Language processing
Communication and cultures
Meaning and context
Chunky language: investigating formulaic sequences
Gender in language and communication
Online journalism
Journalism skills portfolio
Global englishes
International politics and reporting global news
Corpus-based studies in english language

*The information’s are correct at the time of publishing, however it may change if university makes any changes after we have published the information. While we try our best to provide correct information, It is advisable to call us or visit university website for up to date information.

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