University of East London

PG Certificate in Strengths Based Approaches to CBT

This course is designed to help you acquire the knowledge and skills required to do so in the context of various professional activities.  Examples include coaching, mentoring, education, medicine, social work, human resources management, nursing, counselling, medicine, business, law, advocacy, prison and rehabilitation services, youth work, police work, charity aid work, pastoral care, palliative care, community services and mental-health services.

Entry Requirements

Qualifications

Minimum 2:2 Honours 

Additional Requirements

Applications from students who hold an undergraduate or postgraduate degree in psychology, counselling, psychotherapy or a broadly relevant subject will be considered, subject to interview. Students need to hold a minimum 2:2 degree in such a subject-area; or an equivalent Level 7 certification; to be considered on the basis of holding a degree. 

Applicants with Diploma Level 5 or other certifications; or career-changers who can demonstrate extensive professional experience in place of a degree; will also be considered. That will be the case for leaders, managers and professionals with skilled helping and/or health and social care experience who wish to develop an understanding of the requirements of ethical practice in research supervision. 

Applicants who demonstrate an ability to successfully engage with the requirements of the course will be accepted following the assessment of the application by the Course Leader (comprising the application itself, an online (i.e., webcam-based) individual interview, a personal statement and an online (i.e., webcam-based) group activity.  

English Language requirements

Overall IELTS 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in Writing, Speaking, Reading and Listening (or recognised equivalent). 

If you do not meet the academic English language requirements for your course, you may be eligible to enrol onto a pre-sessional English programme. The length of the course will depend on your current level of English and the requirements for your degree programme. We offer a 5-week and an 11-week pre-sessional course.

Mature applicants and those without formal qualifications

As an inclusive University, we recognise that applicants who have been out of education for some time may not have the formal qualifications usually required for entry to a course. We welcome applications from those who can demonstrate their enthusiasm and commitment to study and have the relevant life/work experience that equips them to succeed on the course. We will assess this from the information provided in your application - in particular your personal statement - to help us decide on your eligibility for the course.

Career Prospects

You are likely to be involved in, or aspire to be involved in, a helping role within an educational, management, social care, nursing, advocacy, psychology, counselling, coaching, psychotherapy or other allied helping settings. 

You might be, or aspire to be, a supervisor, manager, mentor, team leader or other role in which those you work with occasionally look to you for support, guidance, clarity or clear ways forward in either personal or professional settings. 

This training is well-positioned to help you upskill in terms of strategies and techniques, all whilst giving you confidence in ensuring that you can facilitate helpful self-enquiry on the part of those you support and/or lead, whether your contact with those you support is one-off, intermittent, occasional or ongoing. The skills you will acquire can be directly applied in clinical and other helping settings, offering what tends to be a more positive experience than helping endeavours which are solely problem-focused in their nature. 

Whatever your present and future roles and responsibilities, you will find yourself equipped to use an array of analytical and critical-thinking skills to identify, select and apply a set of reflective-practice competences which are consistent with a strengths-based approach to helping in various settings and contexts. 

Course Details

This course is designed to give you the opportunity to develop and demonstrate an understanding of both the art and science of strengths-based approaches in CBT, particularly as viewed through the lens of relevant neuroscientific underpinnings. These approaches will be framed as adjuncts to evidence-based practice; as such, an emphasis will be placed on the specific maps to what is known as 'classic' CBT.  

You will develop and demonstrate skills which can be directly applied in clinical and other helping settings, offering what tends to be a more positive experience than helping endeavours which are solely problem-focused in their nature. It is anticipated that embracing this perspective will inform and enhance your existing competences, all by means of experiencing, first-hand, the distinctions involved in adopting a strengths-based approach. 

The full Postgraduate Certificate training comprises two core modules, either of which can also be taken independently as stand-alone short courses which are titled similarly to the modules. 

In the module 'Strengths-Based Approaches: Principles, Qualities and Antecedents' (or in the similarly-titled short course whose content is equivalent), a strong emphasis will be placed on equipping you to critically reflect on the theoretical and research underpinnings of strengths-based approaches in CBT. Having acquired an induction to these matters, you'll be encouraged to critically reflect on your own approaches toward helping as you experience and practise a carefully curated array of skills and techniques associated with strengths-based approaches. 

Whilst making various personal and professional discoveries, you'll be introduced to some of the many ways of assessing and formulating a help-seeker's challenges from a strengths-based perspective. You'll also gain confidence in making a set of critical judgements on the application of strengths-based approaches to a range of mental-health conditions. Doing so will induct you to a critical reflection on emerging developments in relation to theories of emotion, neuroscience and the use of experiential interventions to impact all levels of a given schema, i.e., body, emotion, cognition and behaviour. 

In the module 'Strengths-Based Interventions: Evidence, Practice and Mechanisms of Change' (or in the similarly-titled short course whose content is equivalent), the emphasis is placed on applying in practice your critical reflections on your own approaches to helping, with the opportunity to experience and practise a carefully curated array of skills and techniques associated with strengths-based approaches. 

These activities will enhance your ability to apply in practice your critical reflections on emerging development in relation to theories of emotion, neuroscience and the use of experiential interventions.  

Strengths-Based Approaches: Principles, Qualities and Antecedents
Strengths-Based Interventions: Evidence, Practice and Mechanisms of Change

*The information’s are correct at the time of publishing, however it may change if university makes any changes after we have published the information. While we try our best to provide correct information, It is advisable to call us or visit university website for up to date information.

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